FGSL News May 2015

30 May 2015

Michael Palin Launches first Edible Playground in Camden

Carlton Primary Tackles Food Poverty and Childhood Obesity at School

Edible Playgrounds (EP), a project led by Trees for Cities (TfC), to provide schools in urban areas the opportunity to grow food in their playgrounds, today launches an edible playground in Carlton Primary School in Camden, London.

EP benefits children’s health and education by offering those living in urban areas the opportunity to grow, harvest and eat good food, and integrate outdoor learning into the school curriculum. By transforming school grounds into fully functional food growing spaces, EP provides children the opportunity to be active outside – getting them excited about food growing and understanding where food comes from.

Over the last six months, working in partnership with Carlton Primary, Trees for Cities designed and constructed an edible playground in the Camden school. The edible playground contains a greenhouse, vertical herb garden, wormery and vegetable beds, supporting the school to utilise its outdoor space as a learning resource.

Michael Palin, Patron of Carlton Primary School, helped raise funds for the multi-sensory garden and officially opens the edible playground today. Governors, parents and children will attend the opening and explore the garden for the first time.

Jacqueline Phelan, Head Teacher of Carlton Primary School said: “Edible Playgrounds have transformed the outdoor grounds of our school into an incredible food growing space. Children in inner city areas often have limited opportunities to learn and play in natural environments so we are excited that our edible playground will provide our children and local Camden community the opportunity to grow, cook and eat healthy, good food. We are continually striving to encourage our children to be healthier and we view the edible playground as an opportunity to develop this further as well as bring learning outside the classroom.”

Sharon Johnson, Chief Executive of Trees for Cities said: “With increasing concerns around food poverty and malnutrition, the next generation is in danger of losing touch with nature and not knowing why a healthy diet is important. Edible Playgrounds show children how rewarding it is to spend time outdoors and get them excited about where their food comes from. With 37 per cent of children between ages of 5 – 12 not eating enough every day and 20 per cent obese on leaving primary school, more and more schools are now educating their children on how food is grown and on making healthy eating choices. We are delighted that the school community at Carlton Primary has come together to support the launch of an edible playground.”

Michael Palin said: I’m so pleased that Carlton School has been chosen to take part in the Edible Playgrounds project.  It will give the children here, in the middle of a busy city, the chance to learn how food is grown and to help grow it for themselves”.

Trees for Cities has been working in schools to plant fruit and nut trees since 2000. With this track record and experience, TfC’ technical expertise in the delivery of Edible Playgrounds and operations is well established and highly regarded. The first Edible Playground was created in 2003. There are currently over 25 Edible Playgrounds in the UK with a further 50 to be rolled out over the next three years.
The project has also been supported by City Bridge Trust, Mayor of London, Ernest Cook Trust, Volunteer Centre Camden, Ernest Cook Trust.

Ends

Media Contacts:
Samantha Lagan: Samantha@treesforcities.org / 020 7820 4426


18 May 2015

Rocket Science

RHSRocket-Science_May2015Turning half a million pupils into space biologists

The RHS Campaign for School Gardening has partnered with the UK Space Agency to embark on an ‘out of this world’ educational project. The project, Rocket Science, will give around half a million UK children the chance to learn how science in space contributes to our knowledge of life on earth, using the invaluable expertise of the European Space Agency (ESA) and RHS Science team.

Two kilograms of rocket seeds will shortly take off from Florida bound for the International Space Station as part of British ESA astronaut Tim Peake’s six-month Principia mission. After several months on board, the seeds will return to land in the Pacific Ocean in the spring of 2016. After return to the UK, they will be packaged up with identical seeds that have stayed on earth. Participating schools will each receive two packets of 100 seeds to grow and compare, and a collection of fun and inspiring curriculum linked teaching resources and posters, tailored according to the age of your pupils (Key Stages 1 and 2 or Key Stages 3,4 and 5).

Using these resources, we want pupils of all ages across the UK to embark on a voyage of discovery to see what growing plants in space can teach us about life on Earth and whether we can sustain human life in space through the production of our own food. Schools will be invited to input their results into a national online database so that results can be compared across all schools in the UK. The project is aimed at inspiring pupils to think scientifically and helping them to see the potential of future careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths) and Horticulture.

Schools, community groups and educational groups of all ages and abilities will have the chance to apply for a Rocket Science resource pack and take part in our nationwide science experiment from September 2015.Be the first to hear more about the project, including when applications open for resource packs, by registering your interest here:

Schools that register their interest will be the first to know when official applications for the seeds open.


13 May 2015

MEDIA ALERT: PHOTO-CALL ALERT:

Michael Palin to Launch Camden’s first Edible Playground

Carlton Primary Tackles Food Poverty and Childhood Obesity at School

When: Tuesday 19th May 2015
Where:  Carlton Primary School, Grafton Road, London, NW5 4AX
Photocall: 2.00pm

Edible Playgrounds (EP), a project led by Trees for Cities (TfC), to provide schools in urban areas the opportunity to grow food in their playgrounds, is launching an edible playground in Carlton Primary School in Camden, London. Michael Palin, Patron of Carlton Primary School, helped raise funds for the multi-sensory garden and officially opens the edible playground on 19th May. Governors, parents and children will attend the opening and explore the garden for the first time.

Contact

Email info@edibleplaygrounds.org  if you would like to attend the opening and if you are interested in an interview with Sharon Johnson, CEO of Trees for Cities. A photo-call with Michael Palin at the Edible Playground is at 2.00pm, please confirm attendance.

www.edibleplaygrounds.org


7 May 2015

Schools head to market with School Food Matters

FGSL SURVEY 2016With the help of our fantastic partner School Food Matters, London schools have some enterprising projects up their sleeves this summer term. Follow their progress and buy school-grown produce near you on market day. Schools Food Matters reports:

Young Marketeers – at Borough Market
This project allows children from 16 schools to sell food they have grown at school at Borough Market, the proceeds of any sale going to the charity Fareshare.  May sees the project get started, with Fareshare running assemblies at the schools to introduce the programme, followed by training at Borough Market itself on 14th May 2015. This training will include a hands on gardening tutorial run by TV gardener Chris Collins and a talk about Market trading by some of the stall holders at Borough Market. Over the course of the project, schools will also visit Fareshare to see where the money they will raise is put to use, as well as a visit to the schools by a gardener to see how their growing is going. The project culminates in two sales days, with half the schools selling their produce on the summer sale on the 2nd July and the other half at the harvest sale in September. Young Marketeers.

Schools to Market – at Whole Foods stores
We are starting our great Schools to Market with Whole Foods programme in May, with 36 schools involved across the country. We are now in the third year of this great project and over the this term schools involved will have an assembly run by Whole Foods at their school, a jam and chutney making masterclass by a chef, a visit to a farm and a marketing workshop with Whole Foods. This will culminate in Schools to Market Day in September, where the children sell jams and chutneys they have grown, made and marketed! The purpose of the programme is to teach children all about the value of food and where it comes from. Schools to Market.

To find out more visit the School Food Matters website here


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